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“Movement”

 

0 – 4 months

  • Raises head when lying in prone (on stomach)
  • Supports upper body with arms when lying on stomach
  • Stretches out legs and kicks
  • Pushes feet into ground
  • Supports head independently
  • Turns head side to side

 

4 – 7 months

  • Rolls side to side
  • Sits without supports
  • Bears body weight on legs

 

7 – 12 months

  • Crawls on belly
  • Creeps on hands and knees
  • Pulls up to stand
  • Walks holding hands or furniture
  • Transitions from lying down to sitting or crawling
  • Rolls a ball
  • Stands without support
  • Pushes or rolls a ball
  • Throws small objects clumsily

12 – 18 months

  • Walks independently
  • Pulls or carries toys while walking
  • Walks up and down stairs with support
  • Throws a ball forward

 

18 – 24 months

  • Kicks ball forward
  • Runs fairly well
  • Climbs into chair and sits

 

2 – 2 ½ years

  • Runs easily
  • Catches a large ball
  • Rides tricycle
  • Jumps forward and backward
  • Walks up and down stairs with both feet on each step

 

2 ½ – 3 years

  • Walks up steps alternating feet
  • Hops on one foot
  • Stands on one foot for several seconds
  • Walks on tiptoes
  • Avoids obstacles when walking

 

3 – 3 ½  years

  • Kicks a rolling ball
  • Balances on one leg with hands on hips
  • Bounces and catches a large ball

 

3 ½ – 4 years

  • Jumps forward with feet together
  • Walks down stairs alternating feet without support
  • Maneuvers a tricycle around obstacles
  • Performs a forward roll
  • Changes direction while running

 

4 – 4 ½ years

  • Gallops forward
  • Walks 10 feet carrying large object
  • Maintains momentum on a swing

 

4 ½ – 5 years

  • Hangs from bar/trapeze
  • Hops forward

 

5 – 5 ½ years

  • Walks up and downs stairs while holding an objects
  • Runs through an obstacle course
  • Balances on an unsteady surface (ie: balance disc)

5 ½ – 6 years

  • Performs a somersault
  • Performs a single sit-up
  • Performs a single push-up

 

*Information presented on these checklists were gathered from the CDC, HELP, and ASHA

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Fine Motor/Hands

0 – 4 months

  • Grabs and shakes toys
  • Reaches for/swipes at dangling toys
  • Opens and shuts hands
  • Brings hands to mouth

 

4 – 7 months

  • Transfers objects between hands
  • Rakes for small objects to grab them
  • Drops objects
  • Bangs objects on table
  • Reaches with one hand
  • Grasps objects in palm

 

7 – 12 months

  • Holds small objects/food with fingertips
  • Removes objects from containers
  • Pokes with the index finger

 

12 – 18 months

  • Turns over a container to pour out contents
  • Points with index finger
  • Puts small objects in a container
  • Stacks small towers with blocks
  • Scribbles with a marker

 

18 – 24 months

  • Builds towers with 4-6 blocks
  • Draws vertical strokes and scribbles in a circle
  • Strings 1-3 large beads

 

2 – 2 ½ years

  • Imitates horizontal stroke
  • Folds paper in half
  • Copies a circle
  • Builds a tall tower with blocks
  • Snips with scissors

 

2 ½ – 3 years

  • Strings ½ inch beads
  • Snips on a line with scissors
  • Puts together 3-4 piece puzzles
  • Sorts different shapes and sizes

 

3 – 3 ½  years

  • Holds a pencil with thumb and fingers
  • Cuts through paper following a straight or curved line
  • Stabilizes paper with other hand while coloring or drawing
  • Puts together simple puzzles
  • Spreads glue and sticks paper together
  • Draws a recognizable face

3 ½ – 4 years

  • Holds pencil with a static tripod grasp
  • Places small pegs in holes
  • Cuts out a circle
  • Copies a square after demonstration

 

4 – 4 ½ years

  • Draws a picture of a person
  • Places a paperclip on paper
  • Strings small beads in a pattern
  • Copies a square
  • Cuts out square or triangle
  • Traces name
  • Draws between parallel lines

 

4 ½ – 5 years

  • Traces around own hand
  • Identifies objects using sense of touch (stereognosis)
  • Holds pencil with dynamic tripod grasp
  • Cuts following general shape of more complex images
  • Copies a triangle

5 – 5 ½ years

  • Copies letter, numbers, and simple words
  • Writes letters of name without a visual model
  • Draws pictures with at least 3 objects
  • Cuts out more complex shapes

 

5 ½ – 6 years

  • Puts together more complex puzzles
  • Prints letters, numbers, and simple words without a visual model

 

*Information presented on these checklists were gathered from the CDC, HELP, and ASHA

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“Social/Emotional”

0 – 4 months

  • Calms with touch and physical affection
  • Develops a social smile
  • Imitates some facial expressions

 

4 – 7 months

  • Laughs and enjoys social play
  • Is interested in looking in mirror
  • Lifts arms to parents
  • Demands attention
  • Vocalizes pleasure and displeasure

 

7 – 12 months

  • Imitates others
  • Cries when caregiver leaves
  • Develops preferences for people and toys
  • Makes sounds or gestures for attention
  • Waves bye-bye
  • Plays “peek-a-boo”

 

12 – 18 months

  • Plays ball cooperatively
  • Enjoys attention
  • Gets excited about the company of other children
  • Acts defiantly, resists adult control

 

18 – 24 months

  • Plays alongside peers
  • Enjoys rough and tumble play
  • Shows a wide range of emotions
  • Easily frustrated
  • Exhibits simple pretend play
  • Desires control of others

 

2 – 2 ½ years

  • Can pretend play with dolls and toys
  • Procrastinates, delays bedtime routines
  • Acts possessive over property
  • Shows an emerging sense of self

 

2 ½ – 3 years

  • Shows independence
  • Participates in circles games
  • Begins to follow simple rules
  • Takes pride in achievements

 

3 – 3 ½  years

  • Plays cooperatively with other children
  • Sits to listen to stories or songs
  • Shares toys
  • Stays with a group during activities
  • Takes turns

 

3 ½ – 4 years

  • Works with a small group of peers for 5-10 minutes
  • Controls temper, verbalizes feelings appropriately
  • Waits to take turns
  • Shows an emerging sense of humor
  • Plays in a group

 

4 – 4 ½ years

  • Asks for help when needed
  • Quiets after being active and waits for instructions
  • Passes and requests food or drink at table
  • Comforts playmates if they are upset
  • Independently tries new activities
  • Bargains with other children
  • Recognizes and avoids most unsafe situations

 

4 ½ – 5 years

  • Works in a small group for 15-20 minutes
  • Displays good sportsmanship
  • Refrains from following unknown people
  • Follows defined rules without authority figure present
  • Creates new activities

 

5 – 5 ½ years

  • Plays group games following rules
  • Maintains “personal space” during conversations
  • Waits for attention and turn to speak in conversations
  • Looks before crossing street
  • Behaves courteously

 

5 ½ – 6 years

  • Behaves appropriately based on situation
  • Plays more complex games requiring knowledge of rules
  • Plays and works without disrupting others
  • Offers to help others appropriately

 

*Information presented on these checklists were gathered from the CDC, HELP, and ASHA

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“Vision”

0-4 months

  • Watches faces
  • Follows moving objects with eyes
  • Recognizes parents

 

4-7 months

  • Can see objects and people at a distance

 

*Information presented on these checklists were gathered from the CDC, HELP, and ASHA

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“Self-Care”

0 – 4 months

4 – 7 months

  • Begins to mouth and swallow foods

 

7 – 12 months

  • Finger feeds self
  • Extends arms and legs to help with dressing
  • Holds a bottle or cup

 

12 – 18 months

  • Brings spoon to mouth
  • Holds and drinks from sippy cup
  • Removes socks
  • Dons and doffs hat

 

18 – 24 months

  • Distinguishes food from inedible objects
  • Chews completely
  • Removes shoes
  • Zips and unzips large zippers
  • Sits on potty chair
  • Anticipates and may express need for bodily functions
  • Opens doors by turning nob

 

2 – 2 ½ years

  • Starts to recognize dangers
  • Helps clean up
  • Unbuttons large buttons
  • Washes hands
  • Brushes teeth with assistance
  • Uses toilet

 

2 ½ – 3 years

  • Pours liquid from small containers
  • Uses a fork
  • Buttons large buttons
  • Can assist with setting table
  • Verbalizes need to use toilet
  • Takes responsibility for toileting
  • Dresses with some assistance
  • Helps with bathing
  • Blows nose with assistance

 

3 – 3 ½  years

  • Eats tidily
  • Can undo laces and velcro on shoes
  • Toilets independently
  • Unzips and unsnaps clothes
  • Puts arms through armholes/sleeves of shirts
  • Puts on socks independently

3 ½ – 4 years

  • Buttons and unbuttons clothing
  • Takes off pullover clothing independently
  • Takes off front opening clothing completely
  • Opens containers and removes food
  • Tears toilet paper, wipes with assistance, and flushes toilet
  • Attends to pre-academic tasks without supervision

 

4 – 4 ½ years

  • Washes and rinses self in bath
  • Dries self with towel
  • Wipes independently after toileting
  • Spreads with a knife
  • Dresses and undresses independently when asked
  • Drinks from water fountain
  • Uses toilet independently with no accidents
  • Blows nose independently

 

4 ½ – 5 years

  • Brushes hair
  • Remembers to wash hands after toileting
  • Covers mouth when sneezing
  • Opens all fasteners

5 – 5 ½ years

  • Ties shoes with instruction
  • Selects appropriate clothes for weather
  • Hangs clothes on hanger
  • Zips up front opening clothes
  • Cuts with a knife

 

5 ½ – 6 years

  • Cuts with a knife and fork
  • Laces and ties shoes independently
  • Brushes and flosses teeth functionally

 

*Information presented on these checklists were gathered from the CDC, HELP, and ASHA

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“Speech-Language: Hearing and Understanding”

Birth – 3 months

  • Startles at loud sounds.
  • Quiets or smiles when you talk.
  • Seems to recognize your voice. Quiets if crying.

 

4 – 6 months

  • Moves her eyes in the direction of sounds.
  • Responds to changes in your tone of voice.
  • Notices toys that make sounds.
  • Pays attention to music.

 

7 months–1 year

  • Turns and looks in the direction of sounds.
  • Looks when you point.
  • Turns when you call her name.
  • Understands words for common items and people—words like cup, truck, juice, and daddy.
  • Starts to respond to simple words and phrases, like “No,” “Come here,” and “Want more?”
  • Plays games with you, like peek-a-boo and pat-a-cake.
  • Listens to songs and stories for a short time.

 

1 – 2 years

  • Points to a few body parts when you ask.
  • Follows 1-part directions, like “Roll the ball” or “Kiss the baby.”
  • Responds to simple questions, like “Who’s that?” or “Where’s your shoe?”
  • Listens to simple stories, songs, and rhymes.
  • Points to pictures in a book when you name them.

 

2 – 3 years

  • Understands opposites, like go–stop, big–little, and up–down.
  • Follows 2-part directions, like “Get the spoon and put it on the table.”
  • Understands new words quickly.

 

3 – 4 years

  • Responds when you call from another room.
  • Understands words for some colors, like red, blue, and green.
  • Understands words for some shapes, like circle and square.
  • Understands words for family, like brother, grandmother, and aunt.

 

4 – 5 years

  • Understands words for order, like first, next, and last.
  • Understands words for time, like yesterday, today, and tomorrow.
  • Follows longer directions, like “Put your pajamas on, brush your teeth, and then pick out a book.”
  • Follows classroom directions, like “Draw a circle on your paper around something you eat.”
  • Hears and understands most of what she hears at home and in school.

 

*Information presented on these checklists were gathered from the CDC, HELP, and ASHA

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“Speech-Language: Talking”

Birth – 3 months

  • Makes cooing sounds.
  • Cries change for different needs.
  • Smiles at people.

 

4 – 6 months

  • Coos and babbles when playing alone or with you.
  • Makes speech-like babbling sounds, like pa, ba, and mi.
  • Giggles and laughs.
  • Makes sounds when happy or upset.

 

7 months – 1 year

  • Babbles long strings of sounds, like mimi upup babababa.
  • Uses sounds and gestures to get and keep attention.
  • Points to objects and shows them to others.
  • Uses gestures like waving bye, reaching for “up,” and shaking his head no.
  • Imitates different speech sounds.
  • Says 1 or 2 words, like hi, dog, dada, mama, or uh-oh. This will happen around his first birthday, but sounds may not be clear.

 

1 – 2 years

  • Uses a lot of new words.
  • Uses p, b, m, h, and w in words.
  • Starts to name pictures in books.
  • Asks questions, like “What’s that?”, “Who’s that?”, and “Where’s kitty?”
  • Puts 2 words together, like “more apple,” “no bed,” and “mommy book.”

 

2 – 3 years

  • Has a word for almost everything.
  • Talks about things that are not in the room.
  • Uses k, g, f, t, d, and n in words.
  • Uses words like in, on, and under.
  • Uses two- or three- words to talk about and ask for things.
  • People who know your child can understand him.
  • Asks “Why?”
  • Puts 3 words together to talk about things. May repeat some words and sounds.

 

3 – 4 years

  • Answers simple who, what, and where questions.
  • Says rhyming words, like hatcat.
  • Uses pronouns, like I, you, me, we, and they.
  • Uses some plural words, like toys, birds, and buses.
  • Most people understand what your child says.
  • Asks when and how questions.
  • Puts 4 words together. May make some mistakes, like “I goed to school.”
  • Talks about what happened during the day. Uses about 4 sentences at a time.

 

4 – 5 years

  • Says all speech sounds in words. May make mistakes on sounds that are harder to say, like l, s, r, v, z, ch, sh, and th.
  • Responds to “What did you say?”
  • Talks without repeating sounds or words most of the time.
  • Names letters and numbers.
  • Uses sentences that have more than 1 action word, like jump, play, and get. May make some mistakes, like “Zach gots 2 video games, but I got one.”
  • Tells a short story.
  • Keeps a conversation going.
  • Talks in different ways, depending on the listener and place. Your child may use short sentences with younger children. He may talk louder outside than inside.

 

*Information presented on these checklists were gathered from the CDC, HELP, and ASHA

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